theatlanticcities:

It’s hard to understate the scope of the problem, portrayed vividly by the Discovery Chanel in an episode of “Don’t Drive Here.” In the first three months of this year, traffic collisions in Lima caused 290 deaths and another 260 wounded. Discovery estimated that for every 100 vehicles on the road in Lima, 2.7 people will die. Rush hour crawls along at just over 6 miles per hour.

The sheer amount of vehicles on Lima’s roads also boggles the mind. For example, last year there were 32,500 buses circulating inside the city. Taxis are even worse: there are an estimated 230,000 taxis operating, of which only 40 percent are legal. Similarly populated New York City has 5,700 buses and only 13,000 cabs.

It’s no wonder transportation comes up as a primary citizen concern in opinion polls every year, with over 73 percent of the city complaining about traffic congestion, and nearly half of the city complaining about bus service.

But, the city’s historic transportation free-for-all is starting to change. The past few years have brought the first government interventions in transportation since the early 1990s, when deregulation eliminated public transportation and allowed exponential expansion of independent transportation companies and routes. A gleaming new BRT line cuts through the city. Developed in cooperation with the World Bank and modeled after Bogota’s Transmilenio, it moves about 500,000 people per day.

-For Lima, There’s No Simple Path to Re-Regulating Public Transportation

(Source: thisiscitylab)

midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue
midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue
midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue
midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue
midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue
midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue
midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue
midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue
midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue
midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler
Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.
Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.
Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue

midcenturymodernfreak:

1950 Rose Seidler House | Wahroonga, New South Wales, Australia | Architect: Harry Seidler

Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was modernist architect Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948. The potential of the Australian landscape fascinated him, but our boxy homes did not. As a result he embraced a modernist philosophy to create this liveable, functional sculptural home for his parents Rose and Max. However, their Viennese furniture was all but banned from the house by Seidler who favoured features such as open-plan living spaces, minimal colour schemes and built in wardrobes. Thanks to Harry they all made their Australian debuts here.

Originally from Austria, Seidler studied under Gropius and Breuer, interned for Alvar Aalto, and even worked with the great Brazilian architect, Oscar Niemeyer.

Source: hht.net.au | flickr.com/photos/88017382@N00 | Photos: Chimay Bleue

(via mediavomit)